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Week 1 - Wednesday Discussion
Posted by: harveyd (IP Logged)
Date: September 26, 2007 09:54PM

1.What are the rules to make a Web-page XHTML compliant?
2.Tell us something about how XHMTL came to exist.
3.Tell me something about XML that the class will find interesting.
4.Tell me something about Internet protocols that the class will find interesting.
5.Tell me something about Internet history that the class will find interesting.
6.What are some things you like and dislike about WYSIWYG programs like Dream Weaver or Front Page to make web pages?
7.Explain in simple terms how to set up a server and a firewall.
8.What are the differences between ipv4 and ipv6? How widespread is ipv6 use?
9.What are other script languages besides JavaScript? Tell me something interesting about them.
10.What is attribute minimization? Give an example.
11.Describe the meaning of the following lines. This might take some Internet Searching.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1" ?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" >

12.Tell us how to use an XHTML tag that we didn't discuss in class.
13.Tell us why any one of the formerly standard HTML tags is now deprecated.
14.Tell us something about tag attributes that we didn't discuss in class.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 10/02/2007 03:16PM by harveyd.

Re: Week 1 - Wednesday Discussion
Posted by: (IP Logged)
Date: September 27, 2007 03:31AM

2.Tell us something about how XHMTL came to exist.

Back in the early nineties an organization in which oversees the standardization of HTML. The W3C or World Wide Web Consortium, knew that HTML though a great standard for home PCs would not work well for smaller, hand-held internet devices. Though their predictions for the popularity of these devices was a bit premature, they knew that a new standard must be developed in order to support these new kinds of devices.

XML was the product of necessity and innovation that they came up with. XML essentially allows one to among other things create and define their own custom tags for use in a web environment. Instead of using HTML as a base, XML was built from the ground up to support a universal format for all internet enabled devices to communicate with. As the newest version of HTML is not based upon HTML but XML it was named XHTML or Extensible Hypertext Markup Language.

Re: Week 1 - Wednesday Discussion
Posted by: (IP Logged)
Date: September 27, 2007 03:46AM

12.Tell us how to use an XHTML tag that we didn't discuss in class.

I have chosen a simple tutorial for use if the <img /> or image tag.

One can easily insert an image into a web page by using the src attribute. Such as:

<img src="http://www.fakeserver.com/fakepic.gif" />

Those who have used the internet for even a short time know that every once in a while you come across a broken picture link. Depending upon your browser you can at the very least give some information about a broken picture by using the alt (alternate text) attribute. Using this attribute you can give a short description of what the user should be seeing. This is also handy for those who are visually impaired and use text readers on the internet. You utilize the alt attribute like so:

<img src="http://www.fakeserver.com/fakepic.gif" alt="This picture does not exist" />

In order to be XHTML compliant this tag must be closed properly by including the forward slash before the closing bracket. No closing tag is required.

Re: Week 1 - Wednesday Discussion
Posted by: (IP Logged)
Date: September 28, 2007 02:07AM

3.Tell me something about XML that the class will find interesting.

XML is new but not as new as people suspect.

In 1996 development of XML began, and has been W3C recommended since early 1998. Before XML there was SGML which was developed in the early 1980's, ISO standard since 1986 (both were mainly used for large documentation projects),and the development of HTML started in 1990. The designers of XML took the best parts of SGML and used past experience with HTML, to created a product that is more regular and easy to use. XML is the child of previous technologies.

Re: Week 1 - Wednesday Discussion
Posted by: (IP Logged)
Date: September 28, 2007 04:38PM

6.What are some things you like and dislike about WYSIWYG programs like Dream Weaver or Front Page to make web pages?

Positives about WYSIWYG: For visually oriented people WYSIWYG programs make sense. Many people are visually oriented because it is the dominant sense. They don't need to know or remember code to use them. A further advantage of WYSIWYG programs is the immediate visual feedback about the actions taken. It is easier to see how images and text are placed on the page, or to see how a table is built, and ultimately what the web page will look like. You can simply drag and drop images easily onto the page. You don't need to spend a lot time figuring out what colors look best or what layout looks best. Usually WYSIWYG programs offer a template that is developed by a professional developer making it easier to develop professional looking pages without the need to hire a professional web developer. Certainly a WYSIWYG web page created by someone with lack of web development experience will ultimately look better than if the same person tried to create a web page using straight HTML code. Another advantage is that WYSIWYG programs are easy to use because they are built in a layout familiar to people used to working with word processing programs like MS Word, thus making the learning curve less steep for an unexperienced user.

Negatives about WYSIWYG: WYSIWYG programs add a lot of extra HTML code which can sometimes create problems in browsers. Not all web browsers interpret HTML code in the same way. Ultimately, a web page created in MS Word might look similar to one created in Dreamweaver, but a quick look in "View Source" will reveal the differences between them and ultimately a page created directly from code. WYSIWYG created web files tend to be larger in size and thus will take longer to load into a browser. It's also important to remember that everyone who uses the web might not have the latest version of a web browser which might have an adverse effect on the web page's presentation in their browser because the HTML code created by WYSIWYG programs may not be compliant with older versions. WYSIWYG programs are usually developed to take advantage of the latest browser advantages. They may even be developed to be compatible ultimately with one particular brand of browser so web clients using a different browser will have a less pleasant experience with the web page. (There are web pages that are specifically targeted to Internet Explorer that don't work as well or even at all in Navigator or Mozilla.) Also the templates offered in WYSIWYG programs may actually limit creativity or the amount of text space available. For example a WYSIWYG template might have a size limitation and if a user tries to fit more text than the template will allow, it might have a dramatically poor effect on the WYSIWSYG-created page's presentation. And because WYSIWYG programs are used by many people, the possibility that someone has used the same template increases making your page less original. Some WYSIWYG programs are compliant with the latest advances in Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and some are not.

Re: Week 1 - Wednesday Discussion
Posted by: (IP Logged)
Date: September 30, 2007 02:11AM

5.Tell me something about Internet history that the class will find interesting.

Something about the history of the internet that I believe the class will find interesting is that in 1962 J.C.R Licklider of MIT wrote a series of memos talking about having a "Galactic Network" a type of network that was world wide that everyone could access at the touch of a button any sort of data and programs that they wanted. Licklider believed that rather than using circuits for the job, they needed to use packets. In 1965 the first wide-area computer network was built. Using a low speed dial-up telephone line they connected a TX-2 computer in Mass. to a Q-32 in California. It was a success, but it confirmed the fact that circuits were indeed not capable of handling the process capacity.
Between the years of 1962-1967 they improved their new packet "ARPANET" to process at 50 kbps as opposed to the prior version, which ran at 2.4 kbps! Then in 1969 BBN installed the first IMP at UCLA and set up the way for the first host computer to connect to their network. They sent the first recorded host-to-host message using the ARPANET network from Kleinrock's laboratory to Stanford Research Institute a month later. By the end of 1969 there were a whopping FOUR computers connected to the ARPANET, which laid the groundwork for today’s Internet.

Re: Week 1 - Wednesday Discussion
Posted by: (IP Logged)
Date: September 30, 2007 04:05AM

4.Tell me something about Internet protocols that the class will find interesting.

Protocols are how computers communicate with each other and TCP/IP is the protocol of the Internet. The TCP/IP protocol suite is comprised of 2 different protocols. The Transmission Communication Protocol (TCP) is responsible for ensuring that all of the data is received - or not and the Internet Protocol (IP) is responsible for logical addressing. TCP/IP is responsible for computers knowing how to get where they're going and if they've recveived all of the data that they're supposed to.

Applications rely on protocols as well. The difference is that application protocols are dependant on TCP for access with the use of ports. Older programs like telnet (port 23) and FTP (port 21) use protocols of the same name. Network management programs use SNMP (port 161) while email servers can use SMTP (port 25). The protocol that we are most interested in is HTTP (port 80).

Network application listen for traffic on the correct port and using the correct protocol to determine what action should be taken.

Re: Week 1 - Wednesday Discussion
Posted by: (IP Logged)
Date: October 01, 2007 06:57PM

1). To make an XHTML source document compliant, you must start by adding the following cryptic lines at the very beginning before the <html> tag:
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC
"-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
"http://www/w3/org/TR/xhtml/11/dTD/xhtml1-
transitional.dtd">

This declares to the browser the version of XML used for the document's code. The last four lines of the code indicate to the browser that it is not just an XML document, but that it uses XHTML specification.
The final change is that the <html> tag becomes:
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">

Jessica Urton

Re: Week 1 - Wednesday Discussion
Posted by: (IP Logged)
Date: October 01, 2007 09:14PM

10.What is attribute minimization? Give an example.

Attribute minimization is when you specify an attribute, but you leave its value blank so as to set the attribute to its default value. XHTML does not support this feature; to be compliant, you must have name/value pairs.

The most common example I've found is when making a checkbox:

<input type="checkbox" checked>

With HTML, you could leave the checked attribute empty because there's only 1 value for it. With XHTML, all attributes have to have a value associated with them. The correct code is as follows:

<input type="checkbox" checked="checked" />

Amber Cortez

Re: Week 1 - Wednesday Discussion
Posted by: (IP Logged)
Date: November 18, 2007 07:22PM

9.What are other script languages besides JavaScript?
# JScript-In addition to other internal implementation differences, JScript uses non-generational mark-and-sweep garbage collection[3] whereas JavaScript (the original implementation of which is the SpiderMonkey engine) uses a generational mark-and-sweep system.
VBScript-VBScript (short for Visual Basic Scripting Edition) is an Active Scripting language developed by Microsoft. The language's syntax reflects its pedigree as a limited variation of Microsoft's Visual Basic programming language. VBScript is installed as default in every desktop release of the Windows Operating System (OS) since Windows 98, and may or may not be included with Windows CE depending on the configuration and purpose of the device it is running on. It initially gained support from Windows administrators seeking an automation tool more powerful than the batch language first developed in the late 1970s. A VBScript script must be executed within a host environment, of which there are several provided on a standard install of Microsoft Windows (Windows Script Host, Windows Internet Explorer). Additionally, The VBScript hosting environment is embeddable in other programs, through technologies such as the Microsoft Script control
C#-is an object-oriented programming language developed by Microsoft as part of the .NET initiative and later approved as a standard by ECMA and ISO. Anders Hejlsberg leads development of the C# language, which has a procedural, object-oriented syntax based on C++ and includes aspects of several other programming languages (most notably Delphi and Java) with a particular emphasis on simplification.

This article describes the C# language as defined in the ECMA and ISO standards. For a description of Microsoft's implementation, see Microsoft Visual C#

6.What are some things you like and dislike about WYSIWYG programs like Dream Weaver or Front Page to make web pages? As a WYSIWYG editor, Dreamweaver can hide the details of pages' HTML code from the user, making it possible for non-coders to create web pages and sites. A professional criticism of this approach is that it produces HTML pages whose file size and amount of HTML code is much larger than they should be, which can cause web browsers to perform poorly. This can be particularly true because the application makes it very easy to create table-based layouts. In addition, some web site developers have criticized Dreamweaver in the past for producing code that often does not comply with W3C standards, though this has improved considerably in recent versions.

Re: Week 1 - Wednesday Discussion
Posted by: (IP Logged)
Date: November 18, 2007 11:25PM

10.What is attribute minimization? Give an example.
Attribute minimization is the practice of writing only the attribute's name without
specifying a value. this sets the attribute to its default value and is forbidden
in XHTML documents.
Here is an example:
<input type="checkbox" name="checkbox" id="checkbox" value="True" checked />

Here is the corrected version:
<input type="checkbox" name="checkbox" id="checkbox" value="True" checked="checked" />

11.Describe the meaning of the following lines. This might take some Internet Searching.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1" ?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" >
-The first line is an XML declaration. This declaration is required when the character
character encoding is other than the default UTF-8 or UTF-16 and no encoding was
determined by a higher-level protocol.
-The next line (2 lines in this formatting) is a DOCTYPE declaration which must reference
one of the three DTDs (Document Type Definition) using the respective Formal Public
Identifier which is Transitional in this case.
-The last line is the rot element of the document and must ontain an xmlns delcaration
for the XHTML namespace which is defined to be [www.w3.org]



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